Connect With Your Values

Values are beliefs about life that people hold. These beliefs cause people to act certain ways consistently. The values that you hold affect your teaching style, as well as how you interact with students. Identifying your values can help you focus your energy and your passion. Creating focus can help you illuminate goals that you want to pursue for your classroom and get you on the right track to obtaining those goals. When I defined my core values several years ago I found that creativity and natural curiosity were very important to me. My mission became finding ways to bring creativity out and allow for the children to satisfy their natural curiosity in safe, productive ways. Identifying and defining these values opened up a whole new world when it came to communicating with children and providing them with unique, creative learning opportunities.

So how about you? What are the values that are important to you? How do you define them?

The first step to defining your values is to define who you are at your best, so take a moment and think about who you are when you are at your best.

Now think of someone that you deeply respect. What are three qualities that this person possesses that you admire the most?

Now you are going to define your values. It takes about five core values to create a foundation for a great teaching practice. Pick your five from the list below:

Authenticity Happiness Balance
Harmony Caring Enthusiasm
Joyfulness Justice Flexibility
Cooperation Courtesy Honor
Beauty Commitment Health
Compassion Honesty Humor
Integrity Courage Reliability
Love Orderliness Creativity
Empathy Kindness Knowledge
Excellence Loyalty Openness
Fairness Faith Perseverance
Respect Family Peacefulness
Truthfulness Self-Discipline Tolerance
Freedom Friendship Responsibility
Security Generosity Genuineness
Service. Serenity Self-care
Gratitude Patience Trust
Prayerfulness Reverence Mercy
Self-Expression Gentleness Bravery
Discovery Energy Community
Community Connection Practicality
Individuality Fearlessness Imagination
Control Depth Encouragement
Challenge Calmness Serenity
Playfulness Change Strength
Gratitude

After choosing five core values, can you identify the one that is the most important to you?

When you have decided which value is the most important to you, it is time to make it you yours – you need to own it! Explore this value and what it has to offer. Find out what the definition of the word is, and look up quotes from people who have talked about your value. Doing this will help bring this value into greater focus in your mind, and will help make your path clear. After you have done some research into your value, write down what your value means to you and why it is important to you. Really take the time to identify with this core value, because this will become the foundation for the next section in the R.E.S.P.E.C.T.ful Classroom Management series.

The Power of “Why”

I am putting the finishing touches on my Encouraging Creativity in the Classroom local workshop. The online version won’t be available for some time yet, as I am still learning the ins-and-outs of putting together an online course.

The information that I am focusing on right now deals with classroom management and how it relates to the expression of creativity in the classroom. I wrote a note to myself in the initial outline draft about the power of “why” in the classroom. This is not a new idea on this blog. I believe that children, like adults, have the power to reason. Their ability to reason is not as mature as adults – they may come up with some off-the-wall reasons for some things. But they come up with reasons – they understand that behaviors and outcomes have reasons behind them – especially when we ask the word “why”. Why do we not run around the classroom? Why do we not jump on the bed? Why do we not write on the walls or the furniture? Why do we not throw toys?

“Why” is an important word to give reason to children, but it is also important for teachers as well. I have had many instances where I have been telling the children to do something (or, in most cases, not to do something) and my brain all the sudden stops me and asks me “Why are you asking them to stop? Is there a safety issue involved? Is someone going to get hurt? No – really – is someone going to get hurt?” Although this is not going to become a post about risk-taking, the question is very important for that reason. How much risk am I comfortable with them taking, as the one who is responsible for their safety? But most importantly, why am I asking them to stop? Control? Power? And if I am asking them to stop, what is the reason that I am going to give them? Trust me, children will be more liable to stop if they have a logical reason – a because that makes sense to them. Simply asking or telling a child to stop is an arbitrary command to them. You may have a perfectly valid reason for asking them to stop doing what they are doing, but they will not know that if you don’t tell them.

The “Because” is just as important as the “Why”

“Because I said so” is not a reason. It may be perfectly valid to you, as the teacher, because the child is supposed to listen to you and follow your direction. But the reason why they are supposed to follow your direction is because it is your job to keep them safe and teach them how to live safely and productively in this world. Simply giving them “Because I said so” as a reason for not doing something does not teach them anything about how you are trying to keep them safe or productive. It becomes an arbitrary command from you to them. How often do you want to follow a command that someone else gives you, without being given the reason for why you are being commanded? If someone continuously commands you without reason, you begin to feel disrespected – and even unsafe. If you feel like your life or work becomes subject to the arbitrary whims of someone else, it isn’t a place that you really want to be in any more, is it? You never know what is coming next, or why you are being picked on in this way. Because that is what it ends up feeling like – like you are being picked on.

Giving a valid reason for asking a child to do something is giving the child the same respect that you deserve. And all children deserve that respect as much as we do. Not only is it respectful, but it continues the lessons about actions having reasons – an important lesson to learn. People become goal-driven as they get older (and this starts at a young age), and teaching children the power of “why” and “because” helps them to realize that every action has a purpose and every purpose brings us closer to a goal. And in our quest to bring creativity to the classroom, it helps us put children and ourselves on the path toward realizing just how creative our classroom can be.

Gain a Sense of Direction

Recently I wrote a post about writing down goals in order to be successful at fulfilling them. However, that was only part of the advice that I wanted to give.

As you know – if you have been reading this blog with any kind of regularity – I am in the process of creating a workshop for teachers in early childhood education. The experience has been very thrilling because I am going back and doing many things that I should have done the first time I tried to create this workshop. The main thing that I have done is gained a sense of direction for the workshop, and I have done this by writing everything down. Not just the goal of doing the workshop or what the different workshop sessions will be generally based on, but the direction of each session and what I want the participants to gain from it.

It hasn’t just been thrilling, but very eye-opening as well. As a teacher I see the impact that gaining a sense of direction has on the quality of the lesson and the information that I want to relay. I can see how important it is in any teaching capacity in order to be truly effective. It is a lot of work, but all of the work has been worth it because I am creating something that is truly magical and inspirational to share with others. And that is how our classrooms for children should be as well: magical and inspirational. It is worth the time and effort of the teacher to provide this for their students.

I am a big proponent of emergent curriculum and project-based learning. When implementing any of these teaching strategies in the classroom, planning and direction is a must.